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« Where U.S. Workers Come From - Top Occupations for Immigrants Born in Cameroon | Main | Bill Zimmerman: "Africa is at the cutting edge of mobile technology innovation" »

April 11, 2010

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Dana

What exactly is a "native-born African-American"?

An African-American is a person of African-American heritage. Plain and simple. I'm not sure of where the confusion lies for anyone.

I am an African-American, married to a Cameroonian. I, like most other African-Americans, am a mixture of African, Caucasian (this is a testy issue for many of us), and East Asian/Native American ancestry. My husband is Cameroonian. He is of African ancestry. We do not share the same heritage, though we occupy different branches of the same tree that is "Africa".

Americans (particularly White Americans) use the term "African American" as a means to simplify a complex and diverse global people (they also use it as a marketing term). It's offensive. It's done because they don't wish to take the time to get to know the diversity and intricacies of the African diaspora...so they prefer to lump "you all" in one group. However, this is ignorant and bigoted behavior.

There is no "native-born African-American". You're either African-American or you're not. Plain and simple. My husband is Cameroonian-American. He doesn't "buy into" my heritage/identity, simply by way of a passport/American citizenship. Shrimp Etouffee, Seminoles, Trail of Tears, Missippi Chinese, Gumbo (our version), Charlie Parker, and Gullah mean nothing to him. Because it is not a part of his identity, nor is it a part of his heritage.

However, those things mean something very significant to us because they are what make up our identity and heritage as African-Americans. That is who we are.

It's disheartening that we're so permissive of the outright refusal to recognize Africa and its diaspora as a diverse array of nations and people with specific identities.

Raymond Ladebo

Greetings:

You are invited to read a fresh, fascinating and timely contribution to the current topical issue of inter-racial families.

Johnny Williams, a debonair likeable young graduate student, raised by a loving adoptive elderly couple started his life journey as an abandoned one day-old, in a basket left at a Westchester church-front. His birth mother was a teenage blond blue-eyed student who returned to her university in California; unable to find peace, even later as a professional magazine editor. Due to Johnny’s hair being peculiarly tangled from birth, he’s forced to permanently keep his hair in braids and to adopt the name DADA because he firmly believes his birth mother must have been from West Africa. His university degree course in Social Anthropology may have been subconsciously driven by his burning desire to find the mother that abandoned him at birth. His fascination with the Yoruba culture leads him on some adventurous travels with many twists and turns while he is also privileged to meet and make friends with some elderly intellectuals along the way.
JOURNEY OF HOPE OR DESTINY adopts Yoruba philosophical worldview to narrate a story that reflects the global influence of race and social construct on different cultures.

The insightful new eBook title is published by Amazon Kindle eBook. Please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/JOURNEY-DESTINY--Phenomenon-refuses-ebook/dp/B007PKQS4U/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1359139999

You may also borrow to read from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library on Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.de and Amazon.fr.
It is an ideal eBook title as supplementary reading in Social Anthropology, Sociology and Humanities.

Best Regards
Raymond Ladebo


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